Apple’s commitment to legacy device support is important for security

Apple @ Work is offered by Jamf, the only company in the world to provide complete management and security solutions that are business-safe, simple for consumers, and protect personal privacy. Today, more than 62,000 organizations rely on Jamf to manage and secure more than 27 million devices worldwide. Learn more

Now that Apple’s World Wide Developers Conference is over for another year, the summer news cycle will be all about iOS 16, the new features for macOS, what’s new with Apple TV, and rumors of upcoming device releases in the fall. Those who manage Apple devices at work will be a season of testing, testing, and more testing. Apple’s old device support commitment with software updates for year coming is one of the reasons iOS and macOS have remained one of the most secure computing platforms.

About Apple @ Work: Bradley Chambers managed a corporate IT network from 2009 to 2021. Through his experience implementing and managing firewalls, switches, a mobile device management system, enterprise Wi-Fi, hundreds of Macs and hundreds of iPads, Bradley will point out ways Apple IT executives deploy Apple devices, build networks supporting them, training users, stories from the trenches of IT management, and ways Apple could improve its products for IT departments.


Apple’s commitment to legacy device support is key to security

Support for legacy Apple devices

All modern computing devices act as a functional cloud remote. Yet so few of our device interactions are done with offline tools. Even apps like Microsoft Word and Excel store data in OneDrive while you work. The context of being “offline” is almost nonexistent thanks to mobile phone hotspots.

With that reality, devices are always at risk of being compromised/hacked. Your device is always at risk if you always online. Apple is constantly working to stay ahead of the various threats on the Internet. In the past six months, we’ve seen two major threats on the Internet: Log4Shell and spring4shell† Events like this seem to be happening more and more. In fact, as Apple becomes more entrenched in the enterprise, it becomes Lake important that Apple devices remain extremely secure. Apple Pay, Apple Health, Digital ID, iMessage, etc. This information is at risk if Apple doesn’t stay ahead of hackers. If Apple cuts old devices after just a few years, many devices that are still usable (especially in the age of Apple Silicon) are at risk.

Supporting older devices isn’t easy

There have been years when Apple releases new features for iOS and macOS that don’t make their way to older devices. Sometimes the reality is that the features are too challenging to bring to older devices without as much RAM or processing power. Other times, holding back these features is about boosting upgrades — and that’s a good thing, too. Anyway, Apple is constantly releasing security updates for older devices. If you talk to someone who develops software for iOS and macOS, they’ll tell you that supporting older devices with their apps isn’t always easy. Imagine how Apple’s in-house developers feel about older devices? Keeping older devices up to date year after year is probably a big challenge. It would be much easier to cut them off after three years, but we see the opposite. iOS 15 supported the original iPhone SE and the iPhone 6s. These devices were released in 2016 and 2015. If that doesn’t show Apple’s commitment to supporting older devices with security updates, then I don’t know what is. For IT professionals looking to keep their fleet secure, Apple’s commitment to legacy device support is critical.

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Apple @ Work is offered by Jamf, the only company in the world to provide complete management and security solutions that are business-safe, simple for consumers, and protect personal privacy. Today, more than 62,000 organizations rely on Jamf to manage and secure more than 27 million devices worldwide. Learn more

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